QUICK STAT (SHORT, TIMELY, AND TOPICAL)

Prevalence Of Chronic Pain And High-Impact Chronic Pain Among Adults — United States
Chronic pain, one of the most common reasons adults seek medical care has been linked to restrictions in mobility and daily activities, dependence on opioids, anxiety and depression, and poor perceived health or reduced quality of life. To estimate the prevalence of chronic pain and high-impact chronic pain in the United States, 2016 National Health Interview Survey (NHIS) data recently were analyzed at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). An estimated 20.4 percent (50.0 million) of U.S. adults had chronic pain and 8.0 percent of U.S. adults (19.6 million) had high-impact chronic pain, with higher prevalences of both chronic pain and high-impact chronic pain reported among women, older adults, previously but not currently employed adults, adults living in poverty, adults with public health insurance, and rural residents. These findings could be used to target pain management interventions.

Daily Use Of Marijuana Among Non-College Young Adults
The National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA) in September 2018 announced that the latest Monitoring the Future (MTF) survey results on substance use trends as teens transition to adulthood are now available online, comparing substance use patterns of full-time college students to their non-college peers. Most notably, more than 13 percent of young adults not in college report daily, or near daily, marijuana use, which is now nearly three times as high among non-college young adults as among college students. Alcohol use is more common among college students. With respect to past month use, alcohol use in college students is higher than in non-college peers (62 percent vs. 56.4 percent). Mixing alcohol with energy drinks appears to be higher among college students than the non-college group (31.5 percent vs. 26.7 percent) in the past year. Some opioid use is declining in both groups. The most sizeable difference is the higher rate of cigarette smoking in the non-college group.

HEALTH TECHNOLOGY CORNER

Micromotor Pills As A Dynamic Oral Delivery Platform
According to a study published on August 28, 2018 in the journal ACS Nano, micromotors can be encapsulated into pills. Coating the pills protects the devices as they traverse the digestive system prior to releasing their drug cargo. Approximately the width of a human hair in size, micromotors are self-propelled microscopic robots designed to perform a host of biomedical tasks. Researchers created a pill composed of a pair of sugars, lactose and maltose, that encapsulated tens of thousands of micromotors made of a magnesium/titanium dioxide core loaded with a fluorescent dye cargo. These sugars are easy to mold into tablet, can disintegrate when needed, and are non-toxic. When given to laboratory mice, they improved the release and retention of the micromotors in the stomach compared to those encapsulated in silica-based tablets or in a liquid solution. Encapsulating micromotors in traditional pill form improves their ability to deliver medicines to specific targets without diminishing their mobility or performance.

Using Biomimicry To Develop Solutions For Human Health Problems
Biomimicry involves mirroring innovations found in nature. An example is being able to assess potentially lifesaving antibiotics rapidly by using bacteria in saliva from an East Siberian brown bear, according to a study published online ahead of print on September 4, 2018 by the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the USA. The technology involves placing a bacterium from a wild animal’s mouth, or other complex source of microbes with potential antibiotic properties, in an oil droplet to see if it inhibits harmful bacteria, such as Staphylococcus aureus. The microbiota of wild animals may help protect them from the aggressive microbes that surround them. The technology in the study used powerful machines to sort several hundred thousand oil droplets rapidly with bacteria from the live bear's mouth. Researchers found one droplet with zero Staphylococcus aureus. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus resists several antibiotics and can cause pneumonia and sepsis, a life-threatening reaction to severe infection in the body, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).

More Articles from TRENDS September 2018

FULFILLING A QUEST FOR PATIENT-CENTERED CARE

Patient-centered care is an important aspect of service delivery, but more efforts are needed to achieve its full potential. Read More

 

PRESIDENT’S CORNER—ASAHP MEMBER FOCUS

Charles Gulas, Dean of the Walker College of Health Professions at Maryville University of Saint Louis, is featured in this issue of TRENDS. Read More

FISCAL YEAR 2019 FUNDING PICTURE BRIGHTENS

For the first time in 15 years, Congress manages to complete a funding package for health and education prior to the start of the next fiscal year on October 1. Read More

 

HEALTH REFORM DEVELOPMENTS

Some states seek workforce requirements for certain Medicaid recipients, a challenge is mounted to stop an expansion of short-term health insurance plans, and savings are produced by accountable care organizations. Read More

 

DEVELOPMENTS IN HIGHER EDUCATION

Opponents respond to a Trump Administration proposal to rescind gainful employment regulations, representatives of various interest groups testify at a U.S. Department of Education hearing on accreditation, and Congress increases appropriations for education programs. Read More

 

AVAILABLE RESOURCES ACCESSIBLE ELECTRONICALLY

  • Creating A Policy Environment To Address Social Determinants Of Health

  • Population Health: Translation Of Research To Policy

  • Achieving Rural Health Equity And Well-Being: Proceedings Of A Workshop Read More

 

HURRICANE METHUSELAH MOVES STEADILY TOWARD U.S. SHORES

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HOW LAWS, REGULATIONS, SELF-REGULATORY PRACTICES, AND FINANCIAL SUBSIDIES AFFECT U.S. HEALTH CARE

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